William Morris (1834-1896)

Victorian Tiles by Victorian Ceramics

 

 

 

Victorian Ceramics is proud to offer faithful reproductions of the tiles originally designed by WIlliam Morris, William De Morgan and Philip Webb.

William Morris, William De Morgan and Philip Webb were three of the most innovative and prolific designers of the late nineteenth century.

For more information on each of these artists, please click on the links below.

William Morris
William Morris
WIlliam Morris (1834 – 1896)
William Morris was the son of a successful businessman, born on 24th March 1834 in Walthamstow a small village to the east of London. He was educated at Marlborough and Exeter College, Oxford. Later he formed, Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co..
more...
 
William De Morgan
William De Morgan
William De Morgan (1839 – 1917)
William De Morgan was one of the most famous designers of tiles from the Arts and Crafts Movement, of which he was a founder member. His distinctive style and deep, intense glazes are instantly recognisable.
more...
 
Philip Webb
Philip Webb
Philip Webb (1831 – 1915)
In 1854 Philip Webb met William Morris and in 1861 became a founder member of Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co.
more...



Victorian Ceramics
2 Meadow Suite
Telford
Shropshire TF2 9QX
UK

t: +44 (0) 1746 710534
e: david@victorianceramics.com
Visitors by appointment only

The Tile Association

TEXT ONLY | TERMS | ACCESSIBILITY | LINKS | SITE MAP

Website designed by goodhand.co.uk

 

 

 

 

 

William Morris

William Morris (1834-1896) was the son of a successful businessman, born on 24th March 1834 in Walthamstow a small village to the east of London. Morris was educated at Marlborough and Exeter College, Oxford. Later he formed, Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co.

They specialised in stained glass, carvings, furniture, wallpaper, carpets and tapestries. The company’s designs brought about a complete revolution. Their commissions included the Red House in Upton (1859), the Armory and Tapestry Room at St. James’s Palace (1866) and the dinning room in the Victoria and Albert Museum (1867).

In 1875 the business partnership came to an end and William Morris formed a new business, Morris and Company. In addition to his commissions, William Morris found time to write poetry and prose and devoted a lot of time to political writing.